RBI Bulletin


Search Archives

PDF document (188 kb)
India's Foreign Trade : 2011-12 (April-September)*
Date : Dec 12, 2011

India's Foreign Trade: 2011-12 (April-September)*

This article reviews India’s merchandise trade performance during 2011-12 (April-September) on the basis of data released by the Directorate General of Commercial Intelligence and Statistics (DGCI&S). It also analyses disaggregated commodity-wise and directionwise details for the period 2011-12 (April-June).

Highlights

• During 2011-12 (April-September), exports stood at US$ 160 billion and recorded a growth of 52.1 per cent as compared with an increase of 30.0 per cent during the corresponding period of the previous year broadly reflecting increasing diversification of exports in terms of destination and commodities due to favourable policy measures of the Government.

• During 2011-12 (April-September), imports at US$ 233.5 billion registered a growth of 32.4 per cent as compared with 37.6 per cent in the preceding year. There has been significant rise in import of gold & silver and machinery.

• Petroleum, oil and lubricants (POL) imports at US$ 70.4 billion in 2011-12 (April-September) exhibited a higher growth of 42.0 per cent, reflecting increase in international crude oil prices, as compared with 31.8 per cent a year ago. The average price of Indian basket of crude oil during the first half of 2011-12 stood at US$ 111.3 per barrel, which was higher by 45.3 per cent than US$ 76.6 per barrel during the first half of 2010-11.

• Non-oil imports during 2011-12 (April-September) at US$ 163.1 billion recorded a growth of 28.5 per cent as against 40.0 per cent in the corresponding period of the preceding year.

• Trade deficit during 2011-12 (April-September) amounted to US$ 73.5 billion, as compared with US$ 71.2 billion during April-September 2010.

• The disaggregated data on commodity-wise merchandise exports indicate that during 2011- 12 (April-June), engineering goods, petroleum products, chemicals, gems & jewellery and agricultural products contributed more than 80 per cent of the overall exports. Export growth was higher in sectors, viz., leather & manufactures and textile & textile products while the same was lower for petroleum products and ores & minerals.

• There has been diversification of merchandise exports towards developing countries with their share in total exports increasing to 43.6 per cent during April-June 2011-12 from 41.7 per cent during April-June 2010.

India’s Merchandise Trade during 2011- 12 (April-September)

Exports

Export growth on monthly basis (year-on-year) showed an uptrend during all the first six months of 2011-12 reflecting the impact of export promotional measures announced by the government. However, after peaking at 82.0 per cent in July 2011, monthly export growth remained comparatively low in August and September 2011 albeit higher than corresponding months of 2010-11 (Chart 1).

01

Exports during 2011-12 (April-September) stood at US$ 160.0 billion, recording a higher growth of 52.1 per cent as compared with an increase of 30.0 per cent during the corresponding period of 2010-11 (Table 1 and Statement 1). While strategy of the supportive Government policy facilitated exports, robust export performance during the first half of 2011-12 mainly reflected execution of orders received well before the concerns intensified in respect of the US and Eurozone economies.

Table 1: India’s Merchandise Trade

(US$ billion)

Items

2010-11 R

2011-12 P

April-September

 

1

2

Exports

105.2

160.0

 

(30.0)

(52.1)

Oil Exports

17.7

27.0

 

(64.6)

(53.0)

Non-oil Exports

87.5

133.0

 

(24.7)

(52.0)

Imports

176.4

233.5

 

(37.6)

(32.4)

Oil Imports

49.4

70.4

 

(31.8)

(42.0)

Non-oil Imports

126.9

163.1

 

(40.0)

(28.5)

Trade Balance

-71.2

-73.5

Oil Trade Balance

-31.7

-43.4

Non-oil Trade Balance

-39.4

-30.1

R: Revised. P: Provisional.
Note: Figures in parentheses show percentage change over the corresponding period of the previous year.
Source: Compiled from the Ministry of Commerce and Industry and DGCI&S data.

As per the commodity-wise exports data available during 2011-12 (April-June), manufactured goods continued to maintain the largest share with 66 per cent, followed by petroleum products (18.4 per cent) and primary products (13.2 per cent) (Table 2). The rise in the share of manufactured goods essentially emanated from improvement in the share of engineering goods. Reflecting the robust demand in the new markets like Latin America and Africa, exports of engineering goods during April-June 2011 were more
than double the level recorded during the corresponding period of previous year. Withinengineering, exports of all major categories, viz., transport equipment, machinery and instruments, manufactures of metals, iron & steel and electronic goods have recorded higher growth.

Within manufacturing, other commodities groups, viz., leather & manufactures, chemicals & related products and textiles & textile products witnessed higher growth during April-June 2011 as against the corresponding period of 2010-11. However, petroleum products and ores and minerals were the sectors which recorded decelerated growth during April-June 2011.

Table 2: India’s Exports of Principal Commodities

(Percentage Shares)

Commodity Group

2009-10

2010-11

2010-11

2011-12

April-March

April-June

 

1

2

3

4

I. Primary Products

14.8

13.9

13.3

13.2

Agriculture and Allied Products

9.9

9.7

7.9

9.5

Ores and Minerals

4.8

4.2

5.4

3.7

II. Manufactured Goods

64.4

66.1

62.6

66.0

Leather and Manufactures

1.9

1.5

1.6

1.4

Chemicals and Related Products

   12.8

11.4

12.0

11.7

Engineering Goods

21.4

27.0

24.9

32.9

Textiles and Textile Products

11.1

9.2

10.1

8.7

Gems and Jewellery

16.2

16.0

13.2

10.4

III. Petroleum Products

15.8

16.5

16.0

18.4

IV. Others

5.0

3.5

8.1

2.4

Total

100

100

100

100

Source: Compiled from DGCI&S data.

Lower growth in commodities, viz., ores & minerals possibly reflects reduced demand for basic inputs due to concerns with regard to global slowdown. Furthermore, the impact of quantitative restrictions imposed on exports of raw cotton was evident in negative growth recorded during April-June 2011 (Statement 2). However, the export of raw cotton has now been placed on open general licensing by the government since July 31, 2011.

During 2011-12 (April-June), the share of developing countries and OPEC countries in India’s exports improved as compared to April-June 2010 (Table 3). It reflects the impact of government’s policy focus on diversification of Indian exports to other markets, especially those located in Latin America, Africa, parts of Asia and Oceania.

Table 3: India’s Exports to Principal Regions

(Percentage Shares)

Commodity Group

2009-10

2010-11

2010-11

2011-12

April-March

April-June

 

1

2

3

4

I. OECD Countries

35.9

33.3

33.6

33.7

EU

20.1

18.4

16.8

18.3

North America

11.5

10.6

11.8

10.9

US

10.9

10.1

11.3

10.4

Asia and Oceania

2.9

2.8

3.4

2.5

Other OECD Countries

1.3

1.5

1.5

1.9

II. OPEC

21.1

21.5

20.7

21.3

III. Eastern Europe

1.0

1.2

1.1

1.1

IV. Developing Countries

39.2

41.5

41.7

43.6

Asia

29.8

30.9

30.1

31.2

SAARC

4.7

5.0

4.4

4.6

Other Asian Developing Countries

25.1

25.9

25.6

26.6

People’s Republic of China

6.5

7.6

6.0

5.1

Africa

5.8

6.5

7.3

7.5

Latin America

3.6

4.1

4.2

4.8

V. Others/Unspecified

2.8

2.5

2.9

0.3

Total Exports

100

100

100

100

Source: Compiled from DGCI&S data.

Country-wise exports during 2011-12 (April-June) indicate that the UAE continued to remain the largest importer of Indian goods with a share of 11.6 per cent, followed by the US (10.4 per cent), Singapore (8.0 per cent), China (5.1 per cent) and Indonesia (3.0 per cent). These five countries together accounted for around 38 per cent of India’s total exports during April-June 2011. In spite of uncertainties prevailing in Europe, India’s exports to Germany, U.K., Netherlands, Italy and Belgium grew significantly during April-June 2011. Among major export destinations, US, Japan, China and Hong Kong were the economies where India’s exports showed lower growth during April-June 2011(Statement 3).

Imports

During 2011-12 (April-September), imports at US$ 233.5 billion registered a growth of 32.4 per cent (37.6 per cent a year ago) [Statement 2]. Import growth was primarily led by a spurt in petroleum, oil and lubricants (POL), gold & silver and machinery.

During 2011-12 (April-September), the POL imports at US$ 70.4 billion showed a higher growth of 42.0 per cent (31.8 per cent a year ago), reflecting increase in international crude oil prices. The average price of Indian basket of crude oil during 2011-12 (April-September) stood at US$ 111.3 per barrel which was higher by 45.3 per cent than US$ 76.6 per barrel during the same period in 2010-11 (Table 4). However, non-oil imports during the first half of 2011-12 at US$ 163.1 billion witnessed a lower growth of 28.5 per cent as compared with 40.0 per cent in corresponding period of the preceding year.

Table 4: Trends in Crude Oil Prices

(US$/barrel)

Period

Dubai

Brent

WTI*

Indian
Basket**

 

1

2

3

4

2001-02

21.9

23.3

24.1

22.5

2002-03

25.8

27.6

29.2

26.7

2003-04

26.8

29.1

31.4

28.0

2004-05

36.4

42.2

45.0

39.2

2005-06

53.5

58.2

59.8

55.7

2006-07

61.0

64.3

64.7

62.5

2007-08

77.3

82.3

82.1

79.2

2008-09

82.1

84.8

85.8

83.6

2009-10

69.5

69.8

70.5

69.8

2010-11

84.2

86.8

83.2

85.1

(April-September) 2010

78.0

78.7

77.7

76.6

(April-September) 2011

110.7

117.0

102.3

111.3

* West Texas Intermediate.
** The composition of Indian Basket of Crude represents Average of Oman& Dubai for sour grades and Brent (Dated) for sweet grade in the ratio of 65.2:34.8 w.e.f April 1, 2011.
Sources: International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics; World Bank’s Commodity Price Pink Sheet; Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, Government of India.

As per the latest available data on commodity-wise imports for 2011-12 (April-June), petroleum and petroleum products continued to be the major item of India’s imports during April-June 2011, followed by capital goods and gold & silver. Import of gold & silver, in absolute terms, was more than double of that recorded during the corresponding period (Statement 4). The quantum of POL imports recorded a moderate growth of 4.6 per cent during April-June 2011 as against 7.2 per cent during the corresponding period of the preceding year 2010-11.

Non-oil imports during 2011-12 (April-June) at US$ 79.4 billion witnessed a growth of 23.7 per cent as against 40.3 per cent during the corresponding period of previous year. Deceleration in non-oil imports was mainly on account of decline in imports of export related items and certain bulk items, viz., fertilisers, manufactured items and iron & steel. Import growth in most of export-related items (viz., pearls, precious and semi-precious stones, chemicals, textile yarn and fabric) was either negative or lower possibly reflecting incipient signs of export moderation in these sectors in forthcoming months. Import of certain categories of capital goods either declined or showed decelerated growth raising concerns regarding domestic investment scenario (Table 5 and Statement 4).

Table 5: Imports of Principal Commodities

(Percentage Shares)

Commodity Group

2009-10

2010-11

2010-11

2011-12

April-March

April-June

 

1

2

3

4

1. Petroleum, Crude and Products

30.2

28.1

28.7

32.2

2. Capital Goods

22.8

20.7

21.6

19.4

3. Gold and Silver

10.3

10.7

9.0

15.3

4. Organic and Inorganic Chemicals

4.1

4.0

4.4

3.8

5. Coal, Coke and Briquettes, etc.

3.1

2.6

3.6

3.4

6. Fertilisers

2.4

1.9

2.3

1.2

7. Metalliferrous Ores, Metal Scrap, etc.

2.7

2.5

2.8

2.7

8. Iron and Steel

2.9

2.8

3.4

2.2

9. Pearls, Precious and Semi-Precious Stones

5.6

8.7

8.4

5.3

10. Others

15.9

16.1

22.6

27.6

Total Imports

100

100

100

100

Source: Compiled from DGCI&S data.

During 2011-12 (April-June), share of developing countries in total imports of India was marginally lower than the corresponding period of 2010-11. On the other hand, the share of OECD and OPEC group of countries rose to 30.8 per cent and 35.0 per cent, respectively (Table 6). Country-wise, China continued to be the largest source of imports with a share of 11.5 per cent in total imports, followed by the Switzerland, UAE, Saudi Arabia and Iraq. These five countries together constituted around 38.6 per cent of India’s imports. During April-June 2011, there was a distinct shift in source countries for imports. Switzerland became the second largest source country for imports replacing UAE while Iraq emerged as fifth largest source of import replacing Australia. In absolute terms, imports from Switzerland grew to more than double while that from Iraq recorded an increase of 271.6 per cent during the period (Statement 5). Import of items from Switzerland which recorded significant increase during the period include non-ferrous metals, machinery (except electrical & electronics) and electronic goods, etc.

Table 6: Shares of Groups/Countries in India’s Imports

(Percentage Shares)

Region/Country

2009-10

2010-11

2010-11

2011-12

April-March

April-June

 

1

2

3

4

I. OECD Countries

32.6

30.6

29.7

30.8

EU

13.3

12

12.3

11.8

Belgium

2.1

2.3

2.6

1.8

France

1.4

1.0

1.1

0.8

Germany

3.6

3.2

3.2

3.2

UK

1.5

1.5

1.4

1.7

North America

6.6

6.0

6.6

5.1

US

5.9

5.4

6.0

4.7

Asia and Oceania

6.8

5.4

6.5

5.5

Other OECD Countries

5.9

7.2

4.3

8.3

II. OPEC

32.0

33.6

33.1

35.0

III. Eastern Europe

2.1

1.5

2.1

1.6

IV. Developing Countries

32.5

33

34.8

32.1

Asia

25.6

27.1

27.7

26.2

SAARC

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.5

Other Asian Developing Countries

25.1

26.5

27.2

25.6

of which:

 

 

 

 

People’s Republic of China

10.7

11.8

12.3

11.5

Africa

4.3

3.6

3.8

3.7

Latin America

2.6

2.4

3.3

2.3

V. Others/Unspecified

0.8

1.3

0.3

0.5

Total Imports

100

100

100

100

Source: Compiled from DGCI&S data.

Trade Deficit

The trade deficit during the first half of 2011-12 stood marginally higher at US$ 73.5 billion in 2011-12 than US$ 71.2 billion during the first half of 2010-11 (Statement 1). During the first half of 2011-12, the trade deficit on oil account was higher at US$ 43.4 billion. However, trade deficit at US$ 30.1 billion on account of non-oil account was lower during April-September 2011 as compared with US$ 39.4 billion during the corresponding period of 2010-11.

Global Trade

Latest monthly data available up to September 2011, from International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) International Financial Statistics (IFS), show that value of world merchandise exports on average grew by 22.1 per cent during April-September 2011, which was marginally lower than the growth recorded during the corresponding period of 2010-11 (Chart 2). A comparison shows that India’s export growth has been far higher than that of the trend growth in the global exports during 2011-12 so far. On November 21, 2011 the World Trade Organisation has revised down its forecast for growth in volume of world exports from 6.5 per cent to 5.8 per cent
due to the worsening outlook for the global economy.

02

Cross-country comparison of export performance indicates that India’s export growth was largest among the major advanced and emerging economies during the first six months of 2011 (Table 7). As per the latest forecast of WTO, exports from developed economies are expected to rise by 3.7 per cent (earlier forecast: 4.5 per cent), and those from developing countries by 8.5 per cent (earlier forecast: 9.5 per cent). Going forward, the sovereign debt crisis in Eurozone, weakness in the US and moderation of economic activity in China may affect the level of India’s external demand as these economies are major export destination for India.

Table 7: Growth in Exports: Cross-Country Comparison

Per Cent

Region/Country

2009

2010

2010

2011

January-December

January-June

1

2

3

4

5

World

-22.7

21.9

26.3

20.9

Advanced Economies

-21.7

18.2

22.2

19.7

United States

-18.8

20.9

23.0

18.0

France

-21.9

8.2

12.1

16.9

Germany

-22.8

13.4

17.0

21.7

Japan

-25.7

32.6

44.4

8.1

Emerging and Developing Countries

-24.4

28.4

33.6

22.0

Singapore

-20.2

30.4

37.4

22.0

China, P.R.: Mainland

-15.9

31.3

35.1

24.0

India

-15.2

35.1

41.0

51.6

Indonesia

-14.3

31.9

38.5

34.1

Korea, Republic of

-14.3

29.0

34.3

23.7

Malaysia

-24.9

26.2

38.3

16.4

Thailand

-13.6

28.5

36.7

22.8

Source: (1) IMF (www.imfstatistics.org).
(2) DGCI&S for India.

World Commodity Prices

As per the data on commodity prices available from IMF’s International Financial Statistics, the world commodity prices began to moderate since August 2011. The world commodity prices increased by 27.0 per cent during August-September 2011(year-on-year basis) as compared with an increase of 36 per cent during April-July 2011 (Chart 3). However, variation in indices of international commodity prices (on monthto- month basis), showed a decline in August and September 2011 primarily led by substantial moderation in prices of food and metal. International price of energy items also showed some moderation during August and September 2011. Downtrend in world commodity prices was largely driven by weaker demand prospects and appreciation of the dollar against a broad group of U.S. trading partners.

03

Statement 1: India’s Foreign Trade

Year 

Exports

Imports

Trade Balance

Total

Oil

Non-Oil

Total

Oil

Non-Oil

Total

Oil

Non-Oil

 

1

2

4

4

5

6

7

8

9

  April-September
Rupees crore

2009-10

393,262

52,268

340,994

622,295

181,862

440,434

-229,033

-129,594

-99,440

 

(-15.3)

(-34.6)

(-11.3)

(-21.3)

(-32.8)

(-15.3)

 

 

 

2010-11 R

484,687

81,604

403,083

811,773

190,270

621,503

-327,085

-108,665

-218,420

 

(23.2)

(56.1)

(18.2)

(30.4)

(4.6)

(41.1)

 

 

 

2011-12 P

723,432

..

..

1,055,339

..

..

-331,907

..

..

 

(49.3)

 

 

(30.0)

 

 

 

 

 

US Dollar million

2009-10

80,950

10,759

70,191

128,131

37,475

90,656

-47,181

-26,716

-20,465

 

(-25.7)

(-42.5)

(-22.2)

(-30.7)

(-40.8)

(-25.5)

 

 

 

2010-11 R

105,241

17,706

87,535

176,360

49,405

126,955

-71,119

-31,699

-39,420

 

(30.0)

(64.6)

(24.7)

(37.6)

(31.8)

(40.0)

 

 

 

2011-12 P

160,049

..

..

233,510

70,349

163,161

-73,461

..

..

 

(52.1)

 

 

(32.4)

(42.4)

(28.5)

 

 

 

P: Provisional. R: Revised. .. Not available.
Notes: 1. Figures in brackets relate to percentage variation over the corresponding period of the previous year.
2. Data conversion has been done using period average exchange rates.
Source: DGCI&S


Statement 2: India’s Exports of Principal Commodities

(US$ million)

Commodity/Group

April-June

Percentage Variation

2009-10

2010-11R

2011-12P

(3)/(2)

(4)/(3)

 

1

2

3

4

5

I. Primary Products

5,450.4

7,200.7

10,810.7

32.1

50.1

A. Agricultural & Allied Products

3,901.3

4,256.7

7,764.8

9.1

82.4

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Tea

87.4

104.6

143.6

19.7

37.3

2. Coffee

108.9

148.8

379.2

36.7

154.8

3. Rice

837.5

543.4

823.9

-35.1

51.6

4. Wheat

0.0

0.0

0.1

0.0

800.0

5. Cotton Raw incl. Waste

224.9

252.2

4.2

12.1

-98.3

6. Tobacco

212.9

205.2

202.9

-3.6

-1.1

7. Cashew incl. CSNL

136.2

145.1

209.7

6.6

44.5

8. Spices

268.4

378.2

617.8

40.9

63.3

9. Oil Meal

319.1

327.8

458.0

2.7

39.7

10. Marine Products

353.9

461.3

600.4

30.4

30.2

11. Sugar & Molasses

7.3

11.2

1,528.9

52.7

13,562.8

B. Ores & Minerals

1,549.1

2,944.1

3,045.9

90.1

3.5

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Iron Ore

956.3

2,170.1

718.5

126.9

-66.9

2. Processed Minerals

284.0

388.5

1,432.2

36.8

268.6

II. Manufactured Goods

26,368.8

33,882.1

54,139.0

28.5

59.8

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

A. Leather & Manufactures

688.7

855.8

1,119.9

24.3

30.9

B. Chemicals & Related Products

4,761.3

6,468.5

9,589.5

35.9

48.3

1. Basic Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals & Cosmetics

3,304.2

4,403.5

6,116.2

33.3

38.9

2. Plastic & Linoleum Products

668.2

1,013.5

1,771.3

51.7

74.8

3. Rubber, Glass, Paints & Enamels, etc.

585.6

784.1

1,262.8

33.9

61.1

4. Residual Chemicals & Allied Products

203.4

267.6

439.3

31.6

64.2

C. Engineering Goods

9,821.1

13,458.4

27,004.8

37.0

100.7

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Manufactures of Metals

1,459.3

1,685.3

3,732.2

15.5

121.5

2. Machinery & Instruments

2,115.5

2,448.8

4,035.5

15.8

64.8

3. Transport Equipments

3,571.4

5,608.8

9,546.8

57.1

70.2

4. Iron & Steel

558.2

900.9

3,141.9

61.4

248.7

5. Electronic Goods

1,417.5

1,672.2

2,847.2

18.0

70.3

D. Textiles & Textile Products

4,555.6

5,446.7

7,118.4

19.6

30.7

1. Cotton Yarn, Fabrics, Made-ups, etc.

684.9

1,310.0

1,666.3

91.3

27.2

2. Natural Silk Yarn, Fabrics Made-ups etc.(Incl. silk waste)

68.0

68.8

57.5

1.2

-16.4

3. Manmade Yarn, Fabrics, Made-ups, etc.

775.8

923.7

1,238.3

19.1

34.1

4. Manmade Staple Fibre

64.2

100.3

164.0

56.3

63.4

5. Woollen Yarn, Fabrics, Made-ups, etc.

20.9

22.0

36.8

5.3

67.6

6. Readymade Garments

2,712.8

2,658.1

3,598.3

-2.0

35.4

7. Jute & Jute Manufactures

50.5

110.7

124.8

119.3

12.8

8. Coir & Coir Manufactures

33.9

36.9

47.6

8.7

29.2

9. Carpets

144.8

216.3

184.8

49.4

-14.6

(a) Carpet (excl. silk) Handmade

142.6

215.6

184.4

51.2

-14.5

(b) Carpet Millmade

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

(c) Silk Carpet

2.2

0.7

0.4

-69.7

-33.3

E. Gems & Jewellery

6,158.2

7,135.1

8,548.8

15.9

19.8

F. Handicrafts

47.5

48.4

28.2

2.0

-41.6

III. Petroleum Products

4,434.5

8,674.4

15,079.8

95.6

73.8

IV. Others

2,144.9

4,372.4

2,005.1

103.9

-54.1

Total Exports

38,398.5

54,129.6

82,034.6

41.0

51.6

P: Provisional. R: Revised.
Source: DGCI&S..


Statement 3: Direction of India's Foreign Trade-Exports

(US$ million)

Commodity/Group

April-June

Percentage Variation

2009-10

2010-11R

2011-12P

(3)/(2)

(4)/(3)

 

1

2

3

4

5

I. O E C D Countries

13,764.9

18,175.5

27,645.2

32.0

52.1

A. European Union

7,689.0

9,112.3

15,033.8

18.5

65.0

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Belgium

778.0

1,065.9

2,086.7

37.0

95.8

2. France

706.5

970.4

1,041.8

37.4

7.4

3. Germany

1,238.4

1,342.6

2,296.2

8.4

71.0

4. Italy

743.6

888.3

1,662.8

19.5

87.2

5. Netherlands

1,295.8

1,490.8

2,568.7

15.0

72.3

6. U K

1,390.7

1,508.6

2,336.5

8.5

54.9

B. North America

4,429.7

6,387.9

8,973.4

44.2

40.5

1. Canada

267.4

274.0

445.9

2.5

62.7

2. U S A

4,162.3

6,113.9

8,527.5

46.9

39.5

C. Asia & Oceania

1,090.0

1,841.2

2,054.1

68.9

11.6

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Australia

251.3

322.0

469.5

28.2

45.8

2. Japan

788.7

1,479.7

1,524.3

87.6

3.0

D. Other O E C D Countries

556.2

834.0

1,583.9

50.0

89.9

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Switzerland

126.5

146.9

215.2

16.2

46.5

II. O P E C

8,823.3

11,229.3

17,464.3

27.3

55.5

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Indonesia

974.4

883.5

2,430.2

-9.3

175.1

2. Iran

590.3

363.4

1,411.4

-38.4

288.4

3. Iraq

101.6

139.6

347.1

37.4

148.6

4. Kuwait

199.8

194.3

504.5

-2.8

159.7

5. Saudi Arabia

961.4

1,225.3

1,618.6

27.5

32.1

6. U A E

5,112.7

7,495.3

9,480.2

46.6

26.5

III. Eastern Europe

356.9

599.8

898.6

68.1

49.8

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Russia

188.7

389.4

547.6

106.4

40.6

IV. Developing Countries

14,135.7

22,550.4

35,735.5

59.5

58.5

A. Asia

10,941.0

16,276.3

25,594.9

48.8

57.3

a) S A A R C

1,792.1

2,404.4

3,769.3

34.2

56.8

1. Afghanistan

102.3

72.0

129.2

-29.6

79.4

2. Bangladesh

449.1

671.4

742.4

49.5

10.6

3. Bhutan

22.0

41.3

44.2

87.4

7.0

4. Maldives

18.7

25.1

36.1

34.4

43.8

5. Nepal

386.6

485.6

664.2

25.6

36.8

6. Pakistan

406.5

436.1

290.1

7.3

-33.5

7. Sri Lanka

407.0

673.0

1,863.2

65.4

176.8

b) Other Asian Developing Countries

9,148.9

13,871.8

21,825.6

51.6

57.3

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. People’s Republic of China

2,099.2

3,245.6

4,165.4

54.6

28.3

2. Hong Kong

1,428.0

2,323.2

2,348.4

62.7

1.1

3. South Korea

548.1

695.9

1,698.8

27.0

144.1

4. Malaysia

694.7

1,297.5

1,282.1

86.8

-1.2

5. Singapore

2,185.9

2,823.8

6,565.3

29.2

132.5

6. Thailand

297.0

462.4

797.4

55.7

72.4

B. Africa

2,159.8

3,978.2

6,163.6

84.2

54.9

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Benin

39.5

65.0

318.5

64.5

390.3

2. Egypt Arab Republic

272.7

504.7

485.9

85.1

-3.7

3. Kenya

404.1

570.5

616.7

41.2

8.1

4. South Africa

337.1

1,490.6

1,339.0

342.2

-10.2

5. Sudan

102.4

127.5

455.4

24.4

257.3

6. Tanzania

194.8

187.5

524.0

-3.7

179.4

7. Zambia

17.7

21.8

49.3

23.1

126.2

C. Latin American Countries

1,034.9

2,295.9

3,977.0

121.8

73.2

V. Others

202.8

16.8

58.4

-91.7

247.9

VI. Unspecified

1,114.9

1,557.8

232.6

39.7

-85.1

Total Exports

38,398.5

54,129.6

82,034.6

41.0

51.6

P: Provisional. R: Revised.
Source: DGCI&S.


Statement 4: India’s Imports of Principal Commodities

(US$ million)

Commodity/Group

April-June

Percentage Variation

2009-10

2010-11R

2011-12P

(3)/(2)

(4)/(3)

 

1

2

3

4

5

I.

Bulk Imports

25,069.8

37,769.7

50,224.3

50.7

33.0

 

A. Petroleum, Petroleum Products & Related Material

16,649.0

25,855.5

37,658.8

55.3

45.7

 

B. Bulk Consumption Goods

1,760.5

1,995.1

2,416.4

13.3

21.1

 

1. Wheat

0.0

13.1

0.0

0.0

-100.0

 

2. Cereals & Cereal Preparations

9.8

11.7

17.8

19.7

51.4

 

3. Edible Oil

1,225.8

1,340.7

2,004.1

9.4

49.5

 

4. Pulses

386.9

318.7

393.9

-17.6

23.6

 

5. Sugar

138.1

310.9

0.6

125.2

-99.8

 

C. Other Bulk Items

6,660.3

9,919.2

10,149.1

48.9

2.3

 

1. Fertilisers

1,715.0

2,049.8

1,434.4

19.5

-30.0

 

a) Crude

214.3

163.9

257.5

-23.5

57.1

 

b) Sulphur & Unroasted Iron Pyrites

27.7

65.7

88.4

137.5

34.6

 

c) Manufactured

1,473.1

1,820.2

1,088.5

23.6

-40.2

 

2. Non-Ferrous Metals

691.0

1,034.3

1,304.7

49.7

26.1

 

3. Paper, Paperboard & Mgfd. incl. Newsprint

317.7

486.7

618.4

53.2

27.1

 

4. Crude Rubber, incl. Synthetic & Reclaimed

210.7

416.1

631.0

97.5

51.7

 

5. Pulp & Waste Paper

196.2

313.9

354.3

60.0

12.9

 

6. Metalliferrous Ores & Metal Scrap etc.

1,707.5

2,535.8

3,201.6

48.5

26.3

 

7. Iron & Steel

1,822.1

3,082.6

2,604.8

69.2

-15.5

II.

Non-Bulk Imports

37,362.3

52,301.0

66,881.4

40.0

27.9

 

A. Capital Goods

15,866.9

19,435.1

22,705.0

22.5

16.8

 

1. Manufactures of Metals

552.2

707.7

957.0

28.2

35.2

 

2. Machine Tools

410.8

462.5

739.6

12.6

59.9

 

3. Machinery except Electrical & Electronics

4,934.7

5,611.2

7,486.9

13.7

33.4

 

4. Electrical Machinery except Electronics

721.8

885.2

1,177.0

22.6

33.0

 

5. Electronic Goods incl. Computer Software

5,628.3

7,414.9

8,349.7

31.7

12.6

 

6. Transport Equipment

2,467.4

2,647.3

2,285.2

7.3

-13.7

 

7. Project Goods

1,151.7

1,706.3

1,709.6

48.2

0.2

 

B. Mainly Export Related Items

6,661.0

12,527.7

11,869.8

88.1

-5.3

 

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Pearl, Precious, Semi-Precious Stones

2,895.9

7,588.9

6,239.8

162.1

-17.8

 

2. Chemicals, Organic & Inorganic

2,977.5

3,955.2

4,463.5

32.8

12.9

 

3. Textile Yarn, Fabric, etc.

606.6

789.5

886.4

30.2

12.3

 

4. Cashew Nuts

181.1

194.1

279.6

7.2

44.0

 

C. Others

14,834.4

20,338.2

32,306.6

37.1

58.8

 

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Gold & Silver

6,001.1

8,085.1

17,924.8

34.7

121.7

 

2. Artificial Resins & Plastic Materials etc.

1,274.2

1,827.2

1,755.8

43.4

-3.9

 

3. Professional Instruments etc., except Electrical

973.4

1,128.4

1,210.2

15.9

7.2

 

4. Coal, Coke & Briquettes etc.

2,341.7

3,286.5

3,979.9

40.4

21.1

 

5. Medicinal & Pharmaceutical Products

485.3

599.4

646.6

23.5

7.9

 

6. Chemical Material & Products

513.7

801.1

953.8

56.0

19.1

 

7. Non-Metallic Mineral Manufactures

245.7

338.6

462.2

37.8

36.5

 

Total Imports

62,432.1

90,070.7

117,105.7

44.3

30.0

 

Memo  Items

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-Oil Imports

45,783.1

64,215.2

79,446.9

40.3

23.7

 

Non-Oil Imports excl. Gold & Silver

39,782.0

56,130.1

61,522.1

41.1

9.6

 

Mainly Industrial Inputs*

35,575.0

51,186.4

56,807.0

43.9

11.0

P: Provisional. R: Revised.
* : Non oil imports net of gold and silver, bulk consumption goods, manufactured fertilisers and professional instruments.
Source : DGCI & S.


Statement 5: Direction of India's Foreign Trade-Imports

(US$ million)

Commodity/Group

April-June

Percentage Variation

2009-10

2010-11R

2011-12P

(3)/(2)

(4)/(3)

 

1

2

3

4

5

I. O E C D Countries

21,693.5

26,765.6

36,090.2

23.4

34.8

A. European Union

8,758.2

11,067.9

13,863.6

26.4

25.3

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Belgium

1,383.2

2,317.2

2,120.1

67.5

-8.5

2. France

1,033.5

1,026.0

924.8

-0.7

-9.9

3. Germany

2,282.7

2,842.8

3,722.1

24.5

30.9

4. Italy

820.9

1,041.3

1,446.6

26.9

38.9

5. Netherlands

469.4

392.4

482.0

-16.4

22.8

6. U K

1,074.9

1,222.9

2,042.5

13.8

67.0

B. North America

4,568.2

5,926.0

6,000.5

29.7

1.3

1. Canada

426.9

564.2

543.1

32.2

-3.8

2. U S A

4,141.2

5,361.8

5,457.4

29.5

1.8

C. Asia and Oceania

4,888.7

5,864.9

6,450.6

20.0

10.0

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Australia

3,186.6

3,564.9

3,494.5

11.9

-2.0

2. Japan

1,582.4

2,084.2

2,784.4

31.7

33.6

D. Other O E C D Countries

3,478.5

3,906.9

9,775.5

12.3

150.2

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Switzerland

2,586.3

3,498.5

9,452.8

35.3

170.2

II. O P E C

17,730.2

29,793.3

40,988.4

68.0

37.6

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Indonesia

2,173.6

2,316.9

3,421.2

6.6

47.7

2. Iran

2,642.4

2,751.1

3,621.3

4.1

31.6

3. Iraq

1,428.8

1,599.1

5,942.1

11.9

271.6

4. Kuwait

1,888.9

2,418.1

2,608.3

28.0

7.9

5. Saudi Arabia

3,430.3

4,893.2

7,328.7

42.7

49.8

6. U A E

3,447.9

8,464.7

9,097.2

145.5

7.5

III. Eastern Europe

1,495.3

1,914.1

1,825.7

28.0

-4.6

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Russia

872.5

1,186.3

1,026.5

36.0

-13.5

IV. Developing Countries

21,010.5

31,369.9

37,648.0

49.3

20.0

A. Asia

16,833.3

24,950.6

30,651.8

48.2

22.9

a) S A A R C

367.9

439.4

626.4

19.4

42.6

1. Afghanistan

20.6

19.8

22.1

-3.6

11.6

2. Bangladesh

55.6

60.9

148.4

9.5

143.9

3. Bhutan

30.6

36.8

47.5

20.5

29.0

4. Maldives

0.6

0.9

1.7

50.0

87.8

5. Nepal

116.3

121.7

82.6

4.7

-32.1

6. Pakistan

58.4

99.3

86.9

70.1

-12.6

7. Sri Lanka

86.0

100.0

237.2

16.3

137.2

b). Other Asian Developing Countries

16,465.3

24,511.1

30,025.4

48.9

22.5

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. People’s Republic of China

7,396.7

11,097.8

13,432.4

50.0

21.0

2. Hong Kong

964.8

1,894.2

2,509.9

96.3

32.5

3. South Korea

1,827.4

2,607.1

2,926.5

42.7

12.3

4. Malaysia

1,143.8

1,451.3

2,124.9

26.9

46.4

5. Singapore

1,807.7

2,048.5

2,648.8

13.3

29.3

6. Thailand

706.9

1,032.0

1,340.5

46.0

29.9

B. Africa

2,899.0

3,447.9

4,338.3

18.9

25.8

of which :

 

 

 

 

 

1. Benin

85.5

80.4

165.2

-6.0

105.5

2. Egypt Arab Republic

510.7

352.8

856.7

-30.9

142.9

3. Kenya

26.6

25.2

29.3

-5.5

16.5

4. South Africa

1,383.1

1,710.2

2,207.4

23.7

29.1

5. Sudan

89.7

61.9

195.9

-31.0

216.7

6. Tanzania

54.2

47.3

34.5

-12.7

-27.0

7. Zambia

20.1

7.8

26.6

-61.3

242.3

C. Latin American Countries

1,278.2

2,971.5

2,657.9

132.5

-10.6

V. Others

47.3

14.3

30.0

-69.8

110.1

VI. Unspecified

455.3

213.5

523.4

-53.1

145.2

Total Imports

62,432.1

90,070.7

117,105.7

44.3

30.0

P: Provisional. R: Revised.
Source: DGCI&S.


* Prepared in the Division of International Trade and Finance, Department of Economic and Policy Research. The previous issue of the article was published in the Reserve Bank Bulletin, September 2011.

2022
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
Archives
Top